Seafood and Sweetcorn Chowder

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Our family loves potatoes. My late father-in-law was a distinguished physician but it was remarkable how many of the sympathy letters we received after his death, regardless of whether they were talking of his career or his kindness, also recalled fond memories of  going down the garden with him to dig potatoes. Continue reading

Damson and Apple Cheese

Image of damson treeWe have masses of damsons this year, one of my favourite stoned fruits. Rather than endless pots of jam, I decided to make a damson cheese, which we love to eat with actual cheese.

A fruit cheese is denser than a jam, softer than a fruit leather. If you’re familiar with membrillo, or quince cheese, you’ll get the idea. Damsons are easier than quince to source and I reckon the result is just as good. Continue reading

Lobster Tagliatelle

Image of Mike WarnerI know, lobster is expensive and not everyone is lucky enough to have a friend like Mike Warner of EastCoastAvocet, a self-confessed salty sea dog who has his own boat, a stash of lobster pots and a generous nature.

I woke up the other day to find a message saying ‘there’s a lobster here for you if you want it’. Daft question. Continue reading

Gravlax with Elderberry and Vodka

Image of elder treeThe elder tree is a remarkable thing. It doesn’t look like much – it’s more of a weedy shrub or a shrubby weed than a tree – but it gives us fragrant elderflowers early in the season, and deliciously winey elderberries at this time of the year. Continue reading

Rack of Pork with Fennel, Garlic, Thyme and Lemon

A rack of pork is a splendid thing and makes an eye-catching and generous Sunday lunch. Cooking chops en masse this way ensures they come out perfectly succulent. Like yours better done? Eat the end ones. Prefer your pork a bit pinker? Plump for one from the middle.  Continue reading

Courgette Antipasto

This is quite the most brilliant way to use up a courgette glut I’ve discovered so far this year. Those of you who don’t have gardens, butter up your local allotmenteers (they’ll be delighted to offload some) or just buy half a dozen from your greengrocer. It’s really worth the effort to have a jar of these in the fridge. Continue reading