Brexit Pie

I thought it was a joke when I heard that some enterprising company was selling so-called Brexit Boxes, a stock of freeze-dried meals (and a water filter and fire starter) to see householders through any food shortages following a No Deal Brexit. I laughed even harder when I realised they were charging nearly £300. Continue reading

Mutton Chops Masala

Milk-fed lamb makes sense if you’re living in a culture where you cook on an open fire and long, slow braises are pretty much out of the question. Who wouldn’t prefer something you can chew easily after giving it a quick flash in the pan?

But for those of us with more options it makes sense, to me anyway, to opt for something that’s had time to mature and develop flavour. I love lamb, preferably one that’s had time to roam the fields and put on a bit of heft. But if I can lay my hands on some hogget or mutton, I’m a happy woman. Continue reading

Pomegranate Poussins

There’s something pathetically froggy about spatchcocked poussins but my word, they taste good and they cook a lot faster, staying deliciously juicy. They make a fabulous supper and a very good dinner party dish. Minimum effort, maximum flavour. Continue reading

Cotechino and Italian New Year

Cotechino is an Italian sausage traditionally eaten at New Year. Simmered, rather than fried, it is sliced into rings and served with lentils, the round shapes of each symbolising coins and therefore hopefully good fortune for the coming 12 months. Continue reading

Panackelty (Sort Of)

Long ago and far away in the misty, moisty north country, there was a young and inexperienced cook who found a recipe for something called Panackelty. (It was in a rather grand scroll known to its readers as Vogue. The upper classes were prone to speaking in French in those days.) After slaving over a hot fire for quite some time, the cook proudly served her dish to local friends.  Continue reading

Beef Short Ribs with Quince

Image of quinceYes, yet another quince recipe, but it’s a good one. Faced with a glut, I’ve been searching my historical British cookery books for a meat-and-quince recipe but can’t find one, which is odd when you think we’ve been cooking these gloriously perfumed fruits since medieval times. Our ancestors seemed to use them exclusively for sweet dishes but if you know different, I’d love to hear from you.

So today’s dish is based on the fragrant Persian/Iranian stew Khoresht-e Beh. Continue reading