About Linda Duffin

Food writer and jobbing journo who blogs at https://mrsportlyskitchen.wordpress.com

Sardina Pilchardus

It sounds a bit like something Harry Potter would shout, pointing his wand desperately as the minions of evil swarm towards him in the nether regions of Hogwarts. It is, however, the Latin name for the European pilchard, known for marketing reasons these days as the Cornish sardine (or as Voldemort might say, ssssardine). Continue reading

Sesame-crusted Miso Cod

Image of Mike Warner and Chris Wightman

I’m lucky to have some very good fishmongers in my part of the world, including Chris Wightman from Maximus Sustainable Fishing. That’s him on the right in the photo, with Mike Warner from East Coast Avocet, at Aldeburgh Food and Drink Festival. You can’t tell from my picture but they won Best Stand, a tremendous accolade given the number and quality of producers attending. Continue reading

Venison Tagine with Squash and Prunes

People keep telling me autumn is underway, and according to the weather experts in Britain’s Met Office it started on September 1st, but they just carve the year into quarters to make their statistics easier to calculate. Clinging to summer, I prefer to stick with the old astronomical calendar and by that measure, the seasons change on the 22nd. That doesn’t stop me wanting autumnal food though.  Continue reading

Fennel, Cheese and Onion Tart

We once bought such an enormous plant at Columbia Road flower market in London that we had to stick its top out of the car sunroof and people were laughing and taking pictures on their mobiles as we drove by. I was reminded of this when my friend Lindsey from The Eating Tree gave me two fat fennel bulbs recently. I wish I’d taken a picture before I trimmed them, because they had such magnificently verdant fronds, they looked as though they were sprouting their own forest. Continue reading

Irish Wheaten Bread

Image of a loaf of wheaten breadIf you’re ever pushed for time and you want a comparatively quick loaf of bread, this Irish recipe is ideal.

It’s the antithesis of sourdough … no starters lurking in the fridge waiting to be fed, no slow fermentation methods, no stretching or kneading. All you need are a few basic ingredients, a bowl, a spoon, a tin and an oven. It’s bread making at its simplest. Continue reading