Basics: Shortcrust Pastry

Image of shortcrust rolled and cut for pie lid

Shortcrust rolled and cut for a pie lid

I rarely make puff pastry as it’s so much easier to buy a good all-butter puff ready-made, but making shortcrust is quick and easy, especially if you have a food processor. And it tastes so much better than shop-bought.

The types of flour and fat you use will make a big difference to the finished product. Plain flour is usually best for shortcrust but I follow Katie Stewart’s advice when I’m making quiche and use self-raising flour as the raising agents give it a lighter crust. This is a handy tip too for anyone who’s a bit heavy-handed when it comes to making pastry (that’d be me).

I use butter and white cooking fat or lard in equal measures for a basic shortcrust. The butter gives it flavour (although you can substitute cheaper margarine if you really insist) and the white cooking fat keeps it short and crisp. They will blend into the pastry better if they’re at room temperature so take them out of the fridge 30 minutes before you want to use them.

If you’re not using a food processor, work on a cool surface and work quickly and lightly. If you overwork the pastry it’ll be hard. For larger amounts, increase the ingredients in proportion.

Basic Shortcrust Pastry

  • Servings: makes 150g
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Ingredients:

100g plain or self-raising flour

Pinch of salt (about 1/4 tspn)

25g butter

25g white cooking fat

2 tbsp cold water

Method:

If working by hand, sift the flour and salt into a bowl. Cut the butter and cooking fat into small pieces and add it to the flour. Rub it in using your fingertips, lifting it up and letting it fall back into the bowl. Continue until the mixture looks like fine breadcrumbs, with no loose flour left in the bowl. Sprinkle over the water and cut it through the dough with a table knife, until it all clings together and the mixture leaves the sides of the bowl.

If you’re using a food processor, put the sifted flour and salt into the bowl, add the cubed fats, clamp on the lid and process briefly until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs. Turn off the machine, add the water through the hole in the top and pulse until it comes together into a ball, leaving the sides of the bowl clean.

In either case, turn the pastry onto a lightly floured board and knead briefly to remove any cracks. Allow the dough to rest for 15-20 minutes before rolling out, or form into a flattened ball, wrap tightly in clingfilm and refrigerate.

Take it out 20 minutes before you want to use it and bake at 200C/400F/Gas Mark 6 unless otherwise indicated in your recipe.

Variations:

Sweet shortcrust (makes just over 350g): 225 g plain flour, pinch of salt, 100g butter, 15g white cooking fat, 25g caster sugar, 3 tbsp cold milk. Proceed as above except mix the sugar into the milk and add it as you’d add the water in the basic shortcrust recipe. 

 

 

 

4 thoughts on “Basics: Shortcrust Pastry

  1. My latest go-to flour for pastry is wholemeal spelt. Please don’t wince. I don’t wear sandals (not THAT sort of sandal anyway) or ethnic beads, but I do think spelt makes a really tasty characterful pastry, and light in a way that wholmeal wheat flour isn’t. I’m glad you buy puff pastry too. It makes me less inadequate …

    • It’s a rare chef I’ve seen who makes his own puff, although who knows what they do in the privacy of their own kitchens? I’ve just bought some spelt flour to experiment with (I’m a bit behind the times here) so it’s interesting to hear your views on it, thanks.

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